Abrams v. Baylor College of Medicine

581 F. Supp. 1570 (1984)

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Abrams v. Baylor College of Medicine

United States District Court for the Southern District of Texas
581 F. Supp. 1570 (1984)

Facts

Lawrence Abrams and Stuart Linde (the Jewish doctors) (plaintiffs) were assistant professors in the Department of Anesthesiology at the Baylor College of Medicine (Baylor) (defendant). In 1977 Baylor entered into an agreement to begin a rotation program with the King Faisal Hospital (King Faisal) in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Under the program, Baylor would send cardiovascular-surgery teams, which consisted of surgeons, anesthesiologists, and other operating-room personnel, to King Faisal on a rotating basis. The program required participants to spend three months in Saudi Arabia. Baylor offered high salaries to anesthesiologists as an incentive to participate. An agreement entered into between Baylor and King Faisal contained no criteria or requirements for eligibility. Despite this, several people involved with the program, including Dean Morrow, chairman of the Anesthesiology Department, expressed their belief that it would not be a good idea for Jewish people to participate. This was based on the belief that Saudi Arabia did not want Jewish people in the country and that they might not be safe there. However, Baylor was never told by King Faisal or the Saudi government that Jewish people could not participate or enter the country. No Jewish personnel participated in the King Faisal rotation program. The Jewish doctors, who were interested in and qualified to participate in the program, filed suit against Baylor, alleging discrimination in violation of the Civil Rights Act. The case was tried without a jury.

Rule of Law

Issue

Holding and Reasoning (DeAnda, J.)

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