Quimbee logo
DMCA.com Protection Status

Adams v. Greenwich Water Co.

83 A.2d 177 (1951)

Case BriefRelatedOptions
From our private database of 35,600+ case briefs...

Adams v. Greenwich Water Co.

Connecticut Supreme Court

83 A.2d 177 (1951)

Facts

Elsie Adams and others (the owners) (plaintiffs) owned riverfront-estate homes on the Mianus River in Greenwich, Connecticut. The neighborhood had no public water supply and used water from the river for multiple purposes. Greenwich Water Company (GWC) (defendant) originally provided water for Greenwich and part of Stamford, Connecticut, but the state legislature amended GWC’s charter to also supply water to two towns in New York. The amended charter also extended GWC’s eminent-domain rights to take water from the Mianus and build reservoirs as necessary. In 1929, GWC began pumping water from the river above the owners’ neighborhood. After the owners sued, GWC contracted with Stamford Water Company (SWC) for supplemental water and stopped pumping water from the river. During a drought, SWC could not supply the extra water needed, and GWC again pumped from the Mianus, using more than half the flow during the driest period. When it became evident that existing reservoirs could not provide enough water in the future for even Connecticut residents, GWC planned to dam the Mianus and build a reservoir above the owners’ neighborhood. The owners sued for an injunction. GWC countered that its eminent-domain rights allowed it to take the water and build the reservoir. The trial court refused to enjoin the condemnation without finding that GWC had to compensate the owners for taking the water. The owners appealed on multiple grounds, including that GWC lacked eminent-domain power to take water for New York residents instead of only Connecticut residents.

Rule of Law

Issue

Holding and Reasoning (Inglis, J.)

What to do next…

  1. Unlock this case brief with a free (no-commitment) trial membership of Quimbee.

    You’ll be in good company: Quimbee is one of the most widely used and trusted sites for law students, serving more than 620,000 law students since 2011. Some law schools—such as Yale, Berkeley, and Northwestern—even subscribe directly to Quimbee for all their law students.

    Unlock this case briefRead our student testimonials
  2. Learn more about Quimbee’s unique (and proven) approach to achieving great grades at law school.

    Quimbee is a company hell-bent on one thing: helping you get an “A” in every course you take in law school, so you can graduate at the top of your class and get a high-paying law job. We’re not just a study aid for law students; we’re the study aid for law students.

    Learn about our approachRead more about Quimbee

Here's why 620,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:

  • Written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students. 35,600 briefs, keyed to 984 casebooks. Top-notch customer support.
  • The right amount of information, includes the facts, issues, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents.
  • Access in your classes, works on your mobile and tablet. Massive library of related video lessons and high quality multiple-choice questions.
  • Easy to use, uniform format for every case brief. Written in plain English, not in legalese. Our briefs summarize and simplify; they don’t just repeat the court’s language.

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership
Here's why 620,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:
  • Reliable - written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students
  • The right length and amount of information - includes the facts, issue, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents
  • Access in your class - works on your mobile and tablet
  • 35,600 briefs - keyed to 984 casebooks
  • Uniform format for every case brief
  • Written in plain English - not in legalese and not just repeating the court's language
  • Massive library of related video lessons - and practice questions
  • Top-notch customer support

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership