Alliance to End Repression v. City of Chicago

237 F.3d 799 (2001)

From our private database of 46,000+ case briefs, written and edited by humans—never with AI.

Alliance to End Repression v. City of Chicago

United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit
237 F.3d 799 (2001)

  • Written by Tammy Boggs, JD

Facts

In the 1970s, a group of individuals and organizations including the Alliance to End Repression (collectively, the alliance) (plaintiffs) sued the City of Chicago (defendant) alleging violations of the alliance’s First Amendment rights by the Chicago police department’s overly intrusive and harassing investigations of alleged subversion. The alliance for the most part comprised political groups engaged in lawful, expressive activities. In 1981, Chicago agreed to entry of a consent decree that imposed detailed and onerous restrictions on the city’s investigations. For example, investigations “directed toward First Amendment conduct,” a defined term referring to any investigation likely to involve the collection of information about protected activity, could occur only to collect evidence of criminal conduct and only if the police already had a reasonable suspicion of criminal conduct. The presiding judge entered the decree despite observing that the restrictions were “draconian” and that she would not have awarded such relief but for the city’s consent. The Chicago police department complied with the consent decree for nearly two decades, all while ideologically motivated terrorism became a constant and ever-present threat to the citizens of Chicago. Thereafter, the city requested a modification of the consent decree, which would allow the police department to monitor potential terrorists and terrorist groups, build a file on monitored entities, and perhaps plant an undercover agent in groups as needed. The district court denied the city’s request to modify, and the city appealed.

Rule of Law

Issue

Holding and Reasoning (Posner, J.)

What to do next…

  1. Unlock this case brief with a free (no-commitment) trial membership of Quimbee.

    You’ll be in good company: Quimbee is one of the most widely used and trusted sites for law students, serving more than 742,000 law students since 2011. Some law schools—such as Yale, Berkeley, and Northwestern—even subscribe directly to Quimbee for all their law students.

    Unlock this case briefRead our student testimonials
  2. Learn more about Quimbee’s unique (and proven) approach to achieving great grades at law school.

    Quimbee is a company hell-bent on one thing: helping you get an “A” in every course you take in law school, so you can graduate at the top of your class and get a high-paying law job. We’re not just a study aid for law students; we’re the study aid for law students.

    Learn about our approachRead more about Quimbee

Here's why 742,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:

  • Written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students. 46,000 briefs, keyed to 986 casebooks. Top-notch customer support.
  • The right amount of information, includes the facts, issues, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents.
  • Access in your classes, works on your mobile and tablet. Massive library of related video lessons and high quality multiple-choice questions.
  • Easy to use, uniform format for every case brief. Written in plain English, not in legalese. Our briefs summarize and simplify; they don’t just repeat the court’s language.

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership
Here's why 742,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:
  • Reliable - written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students
  • The right length and amount of information - includes the facts, issue, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents
  • Access in your class - works on your mobile and tablet
  • 46,000 briefs - keyed to 986 casebooks
  • Uniform format for every case brief
  • Written in plain English - not in legalese and not just repeating the court's language
  • Massive library of related video lessons - and practice questions
  • Top-notch customer support

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership