Barnidge v. United States

101 F.2d 295 (1939)

From our private database of 45,900+ case briefs, written and edited by humans—never with AI.

Barnidge v. United States

United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit
101 F.2d 295 (1939)

  • Written by Jody Stuart, JD

Facts

Under the Historic Sites Act (act), the secretary of the interior (secretary) (plaintiff) determined that certain land in St. Louis, Missouri, possessed exceptional value in commemorating the history of the United States and was a historic site. The Spanish colonial office where the first territory of the Upper Louisiana Purchase was transferred to the United States during Thomas Jefferson’s administration was located on the land. Also located on the land was the government house at which the Spanish commandant in St. Louis transferred possession of upper Louisiana to United States Army Captain Stoddard as France’s delegated representative, who then, as the agent of the United States, took formal possession of the Louisiana Purchase. The Spanish, French, and American flags were raised successively over the site within a 24-hour period. The land also included the places where the first civil government west of the Mississippi was established; the Santa Fe, the Oregon, and other trails originated; Lewis and Clark prepared for their exploration trip; and the Dred Scott case was tried. Following the secretary’s determination, the president issued an executive order directing the secretary to acquire the land to develop and preserve it for the purpose of the act. The secretary then filed a petition in federal court for condemnation of the land. The lower court approved the condemnation in eminent-domain proceedings. Barnidge (defendant), one of the landowners, appealed, alleging that the purpose for which the land was being acquired was not a public use.

Rule of Law

Issue

Holding and Reasoning (Gardner, J.)

What to do next…

  1. Unlock this case brief with a free (no-commitment) trial membership of Quimbee.

    You’ll be in good company: Quimbee is one of the most widely used and trusted sites for law students, serving more than 742,000 law students since 2011. Some law schools—such as Yale, Berkeley, and Northwestern—even subscribe directly to Quimbee for all their law students.

    Unlock this case briefRead our student testimonials
  2. Learn more about Quimbee’s unique (and proven) approach to achieving great grades at law school.

    Quimbee is a company hell-bent on one thing: helping you get an “A” in every course you take in law school, so you can graduate at the top of your class and get a high-paying law job. We’re not just a study aid for law students; we’re the study aid for law students.

    Learn about our approachRead more about Quimbee

Here's why 742,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:

  • Written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students. 45,900 briefs, keyed to 984 casebooks. Top-notch customer support.
  • The right amount of information, includes the facts, issues, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents.
  • Access in your classes, works on your mobile and tablet. Massive library of related video lessons and high quality multiple-choice questions.
  • Easy to use, uniform format for every case brief. Written in plain English, not in legalese. Our briefs summarize and simplify; they don’t just repeat the court’s language.

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership
Here's why 742,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:
  • Reliable - written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students
  • The right length and amount of information - includes the facts, issue, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents
  • Access in your class - works on your mobile and tablet
  • 45,900 briefs - keyed to 984 casebooks
  • Uniform format for every case brief
  • Written in plain English - not in legalese and not just repeating the court's language
  • Massive library of related video lessons - and practice questions
  • Top-notch customer support

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership