Community College Dist. 508 v. McKinley

513 N.E.2d 951 (1987)

From our private database of 45,900+ case briefs, written and edited by humans—never with AI.

Community College Dist. 508 v. McKinley

Illinois Appellate Court
513 N.E.2d 951 (1987)

Facts

Ronald McKinley (plaintiff) was a tenured radiology instructor at a community college overseen by the Board of Trustees of Community College District 508 (the board) (defendant). McKinley’s contract barred him from accepting any concurrent full-time employment position while he was teaching. The board’s collective-bargaining agreement with the teachers’ union contained a similar provision. Full-time employment was not defined in either document. McKinley, while employed by the board, began working a second job in the radiology department of a hospital. Initially, McKinley worked an average of 37.13 hours per week, even though his application for hospital employment specified that he was supposed to work 72 hours per two-week period. Under the hospital’s policies, full-time employment was defined as working 75 or more hours per two-week period. The head of the radiology department stated that McKinley had been hired as a part-time employee because of his teaching responsibilities. McKinley did, however, receive full-time benefits. For three years, McKinley omitted this employment on yearly employment-disclosure forms that faculty were required to fill out. When he finally did disclose it, McKinley had voluntarily reduced his work period to 20 hours per week. After learning of McKinley’s outside employment, McKinley’s director of labor relations at the college recommended that he be terminated. McKinley received notice from the board that he was being terminated for violating his contract’s ban on outside full-time employment. McKinley sought administrative review by an independent hearing officer, who ultimately ruled in his favor and ordered his reinstatement, concluding that, even though McKinley had falsified his employment-disclosure statements, termination was too harsh of a punishment. The hearing officer’s decision was based, in part, on the ambiguity surrounding the term full-time employment in McKinley’s contract. A circuit court upheld the hearing officer’s decision. The board appealed.

Rule of Law

Issue

Holding and Reasoning (Hartman, J.)

What to do next…

  1. Unlock this case brief with a free (no-commitment) trial membership of Quimbee.

    You’ll be in good company: Quimbee is one of the most widely used and trusted sites for law students, serving more than 734,000 law students since 2011. Some law schools—such as Yale, Berkeley, and Northwestern—even subscribe directly to Quimbee for all their law students.

    Unlock this case briefRead our student testimonials
  2. Learn more about Quimbee’s unique (and proven) approach to achieving great grades at law school.

    Quimbee is a company hell-bent on one thing: helping you get an “A” in every course you take in law school, so you can graduate at the top of your class and get a high-paying law job. We’re not just a study aid for law students; we’re the study aid for law students.

    Learn about our approachRead more about Quimbee

Here's why 734,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:

  • Written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students. 45,900 briefs, keyed to 984 casebooks. Top-notch customer support.
  • The right amount of information, includes the facts, issues, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents.
  • Access in your classes, works on your mobile and tablet. Massive library of related video lessons and high quality multiple-choice questions.
  • Easy to use, uniform format for every case brief. Written in plain English, not in legalese. Our briefs summarize and simplify; they don’t just repeat the court’s language.

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership
Here's why 734,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:
  • Reliable - written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students
  • The right length and amount of information - includes the facts, issue, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents
  • Access in your class - works on your mobile and tablet
  • 45,900 briefs - keyed to 984 casebooks
  • Uniform format for every case brief
  • Written in plain English - not in legalese and not just repeating the court's language
  • Massive library of related video lessons - and practice questions
  • Top-notch customer support

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership