Dimmer v. State

2010 WL 86181 (2010)

From our private database of 45,900+ case briefs, written and edited by humans—never with AI.

Dimmer v. State

Texas Court of Appeals
2010 WL 86181 (2010)

Facts

Ronnie Ray Dimmer (defendant) owned an auto shop. One day, Eric Cooper, a friend of Dimmer’s, stopped by the shop. Dimmer was upset and searching for money he thought a mutual acquaintance, Maurice Anderson, had stolen from him. Anderson later arrived on his bicycle, and Dimmer asked him to return the money he believed Anderson stole. Cooper was present and later testified that he saw Dimmer hit Anderson in the chest, after which Anderson said he had been stabbed. Cooper did not see a stab wound but did see a small steak knife in Dimmer’s hands. Cooper saw Anderson walk across the street to a store to call for an ambulance, and Cooper left. Anderson died, and an autopsy confirmed that the cause of death was from a four-and-a-half-inch-deep knife wound, which punctured Anderson’s heart. Anderson did not have any defensive wounds on his body. Dimmer was charged with Anderson’s murder and, at trial, testified that the day Anderson died, he had been at Dimmer’s shop early in the day asking for money. Dimmer refused and asked Anderson to leave but later realized money was missing. He believed Anderson took it, which made him angry, and he confronted Anderson when he returned to the shop on his bicycle later that day. Dimmer’s testimony differed from Cooper’s in that Dimmer testified that Anderson charged at him with a knife in his hand and Dimmer took the knife after a struggle. He testified that he did not realize Anderson had been stabbed and that Anderson walked away from the scene. Dimmer also left shortly thereafter but testified that he would have stayed behind to help Anderson if he had known Anderson was injured. Dimmer was convicted and appealed, arguing the evidence did not show he had the requisite intent to cause death or serious bodily injury to Anderson.

Rule of Law

Issue

Holding and Reasoning (Anderson, J.)

What to do next…

  1. Unlock this case brief with a free (no-commitment) trial membership of Quimbee.

    You’ll be in good company: Quimbee is one of the most widely used and trusted sites for law students, serving more than 735,000 law students since 2011. Some law schools—such as Yale, Berkeley, and Northwestern—even subscribe directly to Quimbee for all their law students.

    Unlock this case briefRead our student testimonials
  2. Learn more about Quimbee’s unique (and proven) approach to achieving great grades at law school.

    Quimbee is a company hell-bent on one thing: helping you get an “A” in every course you take in law school, so you can graduate at the top of your class and get a high-paying law job. We’re not just a study aid for law students; we’re the study aid for law students.

    Learn about our approachRead more about Quimbee

Here's why 735,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:

  • Written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students. 45,900 briefs, keyed to 984 casebooks. Top-notch customer support.
  • The right amount of information, includes the facts, issues, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents.
  • Access in your classes, works on your mobile and tablet. Massive library of related video lessons and high quality multiple-choice questions.
  • Easy to use, uniform format for every case brief. Written in plain English, not in legalese. Our briefs summarize and simplify; they don’t just repeat the court’s language.

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership
Here's why 735,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:
  • Reliable - written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students
  • The right length and amount of information - includes the facts, issue, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents
  • Access in your class - works on your mobile and tablet
  • 45,900 briefs - keyed to 984 casebooks
  • Uniform format for every case brief
  • Written in plain English - not in legalese and not just repeating the court's language
  • Massive library of related video lessons - and practice questions
  • Top-notch customer support

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership