Quimbee logo
DMCA.com Protection Status

Dye v. Commonwealth

2013 WL 3122823 (2013)

Case BriefRelatedOptions
From our private database of 28,700+ case briefs...

Dye v. Commonwealth

Kentucky Supreme Court

2013 WL 3122823 (2013)

Facts

After police discovered the body of a nine-year-old girl in a thicket near her home, they executed a search warrant at the girl’s home and brought her parents and 17-year-old brother, Garrett Thomas Dye (defendant) in for questioning. At the time, Dye’s father told police not to question Dye until Dye could retain a lawyer. Police did not question Dye that day, but the following day, police arrested Dye for murder, read his Miranda rights, and transported him to the local courthouse, where two pairs of two officers questioned Dye for about two hours. Dye made no incriminating statements for the first 80 minutes of the tape-recorded interview. Police repeatedly lied to Dye that he was facing the death penalty and would spend decades in solitary confinement awaiting his death. However, police knew that as a minor, Dye could not be death-penalty eligible. Police also repeatedly told Dye he would be raped every day in prison because he was young and a child-murderer. Dye began to cry during a break, and he told police he was scared. About 80 minutes into the interrogation, Dye said, “I just don’t want to say anything until my lawyers get here.” An officer warned Dye that he would miss his chance to talk with police if he waited to speak with his attorney because the officer did not like to speak with attorneys. Moments afterward, Dye began confessing to murdering his sister. Based on Dye’s confession, police obtained a second search warrant and recovered additional incriminating physical evidence from Dye’s home. Dye moved to suppress his confession before trial, but the district court denied the motion. Dye pleaded guilty to murder and other offenses and was sentenced to 50 years of incarceration. Dye appealed.

Rule of Law

Issue

Holding and Reasoning (Scott, J.)

What to do next…

  1. Unlock this case brief with a free (no-commitment) trial membership of Quimbee.

    You’ll be in good company: Quimbee is one of the most widely used and trusted sites for law students, serving more than 546,000 law students since 2011. Some law schools—such as Yale, Berkeley, and Northwestern—even subscribe directly to Quimbee for all their law students.

    Unlock this case briefRead our student testimonials
  2. Learn more about Quimbee’s unique (and proven) approach to achieving great grades at law school.

    Quimbee is a company hell-bent on one thing: helping you get an “A” in every course you take in law school, so you can graduate at the top of your class and get a high-paying law job. We’re not just a study aid for law students; we’re the study aid for law students.

    Learn about our approachRead more about Quimbee

Here's why 546,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:

  • Written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students. 28,700 briefs, keyed to 983 casebooks. Top-notch customer support.
  • The right amount of information, includes the facts, issues, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents.
  • Access in your classes, works on your mobile and tablet. Massive library of related video lessons and high quality multiple-choice questions.
  • Easy to use, uniform format for every case brief. Written in plain English, not in legalese. Our briefs summarize and simplify; they don’t just repeat the court’s language.

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership
Here's why 546,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:
  • Reliable - written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students
  • The right length and amount of information - includes the facts, issue, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents
  • Access in your class - works on your mobile and tablet
  • 28,700 briefs - keyed to 983 casebooks
  • Uniform format for every case brief
  • Written in plain English - not in legalese and not just repeating the court's language
  • Massive library of related video lessons - and practice questions
  • Top-notch customer support

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership