Frame v. Residency Appeals Committee

675 P.2d 1157 (1983)

From our private database of 45,900+ case briefs, written and edited by humans—never with AI.

Frame v. Residency Appeals Committee

Utah Supreme Court
675 P.2d 1157 (1983)

Facts

George and Lori Frame (the Frames) (plaintiffs) enrolled at Utah State University (Utah State). The students applied for resident status for tuition purposes but were denied by the Residency Appeals Committee (the committee) at Utah State. Utah State charged higher tuition to nonresidents. Beginning in 1971, the Frames had resided in Utah on and off, renting an apartment, registering to vote, and filing tax returns in Utah. The Frames left Utah for a period and then returned to the state in March 1978 to recommence their schooling. After being denied residency status in September 1978, the Frames again applied in April 1979, more than one year after registering at Utah State. Their application was denied again on the ground that they had been absent from Utah for more than 30 days during the summer of 1978. Under rules promulgated by the Utah Board of Regents, an adult seeking residence in the state had to maintain continuous residency for one full year prior to the beginning of the academic period. The rules permitted a 30-day absence during the one-year period. The Frames’ suit challenged the rule precluding residency if an individual spent more than 30 days outside of the state during the one-year period. The Frames made several arguments, including that (1) the 30-day rule violated the Fourteenth Amendment Due Process Clause because the rule created an irrebuttable presumption that they were nonresidents; and (2) the rule violated the Fourteenth Amendment Equal Protection Clause because it treated them differently without any rational basis. A lower court rejected all of the Frames’ claims. The Frames appealed.

Rule of Law

Issue

Holding and Reasoning (Stewart, J.)

Dissent (Howe, J.)

What to do next…

  1. Unlock this case brief with a free (no-commitment) trial membership of Quimbee.

    You’ll be in good company: Quimbee is one of the most widely used and trusted sites for law students, serving more than 733,000 law students since 2011. Some law schools—such as Yale, Berkeley, and Northwestern—even subscribe directly to Quimbee for all their law students.

    Unlock this case briefRead our student testimonials
  2. Learn more about Quimbee’s unique (and proven) approach to achieving great grades at law school.

    Quimbee is a company hell-bent on one thing: helping you get an “A” in every course you take in law school, so you can graduate at the top of your class and get a high-paying law job. We’re not just a study aid for law students; we’re the study aid for law students.

    Learn about our approachRead more about Quimbee

Here's why 733,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:

  • Written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students. 45,900 briefs, keyed to 984 casebooks. Top-notch customer support.
  • The right amount of information, includes the facts, issues, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents.
  • Access in your classes, works on your mobile and tablet. Massive library of related video lessons and high quality multiple-choice questions.
  • Easy to use, uniform format for every case brief. Written in plain English, not in legalese. Our briefs summarize and simplify; they don’t just repeat the court’s language.

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership
Here's why 733,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:
  • Reliable - written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students
  • The right length and amount of information - includes the facts, issue, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents
  • Access in your class - works on your mobile and tablet
  • 45,900 briefs - keyed to 984 casebooks
  • Uniform format for every case brief
  • Written in plain English - not in legalese and not just repeating the court's language
  • Massive library of related video lessons - and practice questions
  • Top-notch customer support

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership