Goff v. Goff

352 Mo. 809, 179 S.W.2d 707 (1944)

From our private database of 46,100+ case briefs, written and edited by humans—never with AI.

Goff v. Goff

Missouri Supreme Court
352 Mo. 809, 179 S.W.2d 707 (1944)

  • Written by Rose VanHofwegen, JD

Facts

Charles Granville Goff (Granville) denied that 12-year-old Marjorie and 10-year-old Dean Goff (plaintiffs) were his grandchildren. Granville married their grandmother during pregnancy but said he was not the father, and the couple divorced. Granville never acknowledged the baby, Joe Goff, as his son. Eventually, Joe married and had two children before he died. A niece said Granville once mentioned having two grandchildren but did not want it repeated or to leave them anything because “Joe was not his boy.” Before Granville wrote his will, he argued with his brother George and told a niece, “I will sure fix it so George and Joe’s children will not participate in my property.” Granville left to live with two nephews and executed a will that named his brother Silas executor, directed him to sell all Granville’s property, left George $5 and Silas $1,000, and gave everything else to his nephews. The will recited, “I am not married and have no children,” and said, “I hereby give and bequeath to any person who might contest this will the sum of $1.00 only, in lieu of any other share or interest in my estate.” Marjorie and Dean sued, asserting rights to Granville’s land as pretermitted heirs. Granville’s brothers and nephews (defendants) countered that Granville intended to omit his grandchildren or that the exclusion clause made them entitled to only $1 each. The trial court found Granville did not know his grandchildren existed, but found they were not pretermitted heirs because the exclusion clause provided them $1. The grandchildren appealed.

Rule of Law

Issue

Holding and Reasoning (Barrett, J.)

What to do next…

  1. Unlock this case brief with a free (no-commitment) trial membership of Quimbee.

    You’ll be in good company: Quimbee is one of the most widely used and trusted sites for law students, serving more than 745,000 law students since 2011. Some law schools—such as Yale, Berkeley, and Northwestern—even subscribe directly to Quimbee for all their law students.

    Unlock this case briefRead our student testimonials
  2. Learn more about Quimbee’s unique (and proven) approach to achieving great grades at law school.

    Quimbee is a company hell-bent on one thing: helping you get an “A” in every course you take in law school, so you can graduate at the top of your class and get a high-paying law job. We’re not just a study aid for law students; we’re the study aid for law students.

    Learn about our approachRead more about Quimbee

Here's why 745,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:

  • Written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students. 46,100 briefs, keyed to 987 casebooks. Top-notch customer support.
  • The right amount of information, includes the facts, issues, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents.
  • Access in your classes, works on your mobile and tablet. Massive library of related video lessons and high quality multiple-choice questions.
  • Easy to use, uniform format for every case brief. Written in plain English, not in legalese. Our briefs summarize and simplify; they don’t just repeat the court’s language.

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership
Here's why 745,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:
  • Reliable - written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students
  • The right length and amount of information - includes the facts, issue, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents
  • Access in your class - works on your mobile and tablet
  • 46,100 briefs - keyed to 987 casebooks
  • Uniform format for every case brief
  • Written in plain English - not in legalese and not just repeating the court's language
  • Massive library of related video lessons - and practice questions
  • Top-notch customer support

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership