Quimbee logo
DMCA.com Protection Status

Huckabee v. Time Warner Entertainment Company, LP

43 Tex. Sup. Ct. J. 674 (2000)

Case BriefRelatedOptions
From our private database of 33,600+ case briefs...

Huckabee v. Time Warner Entertainment Company, LP

Texas Supreme Court

43 Tex. Sup. Ct. J. 674 (2000)

Facts

A Home Box Office (HBO) documentary chronicled four cases from Houston’s family court system with a theme of unfair treatment of women. Two of the cases were presided over by Judge Charles Huckabee (plaintiff). One of those two cases involved a child-custody dispute in which Huckabee granted custody to the father despite the mother’s accusations that the father had sexually abused the child. A psychologist appointed by Huckabee subsequently concluded that the sexual abuse had been perpetrated by the child’s older brother rather than by the father, but this was omitted from the film because the film’s researcher doubted the psychologist’s conclusion. Huckabee brought a defamation suit against HBO (defendant), a subsidiary of Time Warner Entertainment Company, Inc. Affidavits submitted by HBO included statements from the film’s researcher, the film’s director, and two HBO employees, all of whom attested to a belief in the truthfulness of the information contained in the documentary. Huckabee, who was interviewed for the film, countered that HBO sought to portray him in an unfavorable light, made editorial choices that created a false impression, purposefully avoided discovery of the truth, and engaged in a suspiciously extensive legal-review process before broadcasting the documentary. HBO moved for summary judgment, which was denied. HBO appealed. The appellate court granted summary judgment in favor of HBO, ruling that the affidavits successfully negated the actual-malice element necessary for a successful defamation claim. Huckabee appealed. The Texas Supreme Court granted certiorari.

Rule of Law

Issue

Holding and Reasoning (Phillips, C.J.)

What to do next…

  1. Unlock this case brief with a free (no-commitment) trial membership of Quimbee.

    You’ll be in good company: Quimbee is one of the most widely used and trusted sites for law students, serving more than 602,000 law students since 2011. Some law schools—such as Yale, Berkeley, and Northwestern—even subscribe directly to Quimbee for all their law students.

    Unlock this case briefRead our student testimonials
  2. Learn more about Quimbee’s unique (and proven) approach to achieving great grades at law school.

    Quimbee is a company hell-bent on one thing: helping you get an “A” in every course you take in law school, so you can graduate at the top of your class and get a high-paying law job. We’re not just a study aid for law students; we’re the study aid for law students.

    Learn about our approachRead more about Quimbee

Here's why 602,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:

  • Written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students. 33,600 briefs, keyed to 984 casebooks. Top-notch customer support.
  • The right amount of information, includes the facts, issues, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents.
  • Access in your classes, works on your mobile and tablet. Massive library of related video lessons and high quality multiple-choice questions.
  • Easy to use, uniform format for every case brief. Written in plain English, not in legalese. Our briefs summarize and simplify; they don’t just repeat the court’s language.

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership
Here's why 602,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:
  • Reliable - written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students
  • The right length and amount of information - includes the facts, issue, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents
  • Access in your class - works on your mobile and tablet
  • 33,600 briefs - keyed to 984 casebooks
  • Uniform format for every case brief
  • Written in plain English - not in legalese and not just repeating the court's language
  • Massive library of related video lessons - and practice questions
  • Top-notch customer support

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership