In re D.K.

58 Pa. D. & C. 4th 353 (2002)

From our private database of 45,900+ case briefs, written and edited by humans—never with AI.

In re D.K.

Pennsylvania Court of Common Pleas
58 Pa. D. & C. 4th 353 (2002)

Facts

By the age of 16, minor child D.K., who was only 5 feet 3 inches tall, weighed 451 pounds. School officials were concerned about D.K.’s weight, substandard performance in school, and absenteeism. As a result, D.K. was evaluated by a doctor, who determined that his health had reached a life-threatening state. D.K. was diagnosed with morbid obesity and hospitalized for six days. D.K.’s health complications already included an enlarged liver, high blood pressure, respiratory issues, insulin resistance, sleep apnea, and knee pain. D.K. was also depressed. D.K.’s father had died of a heart attack, and D.K. was being raised by his mother (defendant). Unfortunately, D.K.’s mother was also obese and weighed around 600 pounds. She was homebound and did not go to medical appointments with D.K. or even visit him while he was hospitalized. D.K. had been obese since he was three years old and had gained 100 pounds in the last year alone. Yet D.K.’s mother did not seek the aid of a dietitian or do anything about D.K.’s school performance or absenteeism. D.K.’s doctors made a referral to Children and Youth Services (CYS) (plaintiff). D.K.’s mother agreed to place D.K. in CYS custody. D.K. was placed in a foster home and placed on a specific diet supervised by a physician. D.K. was also advised to exercise. By the time of the first hearing to check D.K.’s status, D.K. had already lost 50 pounds in only three months. D.K. wanted to go home, and his mother wanted to be reunited with him. D.K. felt that he could maintain his new diet with his mother’s help. However, a nutritionist testified that he did not believe D.K.’s mother would be able to provide the support D.K. needed, which was critical. A return to D.K.’s former lifestyle would lead to death in his 30s. A court considered whether D.K. should be reunited with his mother at that time or be adjudicated dependent under Pennsylvania’s juvenile act.

Rule of Law

Issue

Holding and Reasoning (Saylor, J.)

What to do next…

  1. Unlock this case brief with a free (no-commitment) trial membership of Quimbee.

    You’ll be in good company: Quimbee is one of the most widely used and trusted sites for law students, serving more than 733,000 law students since 2011. Some law schools—such as Yale, Berkeley, and Northwestern—even subscribe directly to Quimbee for all their law students.

    Unlock this case briefRead our student testimonials
  2. Learn more about Quimbee’s unique (and proven) approach to achieving great grades at law school.

    Quimbee is a company hell-bent on one thing: helping you get an “A” in every course you take in law school, so you can graduate at the top of your class and get a high-paying law job. We’re not just a study aid for law students; we’re the study aid for law students.

    Learn about our approachRead more about Quimbee

Here's why 733,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:

  • Written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students. 45,900 briefs, keyed to 984 casebooks. Top-notch customer support.
  • The right amount of information, includes the facts, issues, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents.
  • Access in your classes, works on your mobile and tablet. Massive library of related video lessons and high quality multiple-choice questions.
  • Easy to use, uniform format for every case brief. Written in plain English, not in legalese. Our briefs summarize and simplify; they don’t just repeat the court’s language.

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership
Here's why 733,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:
  • Reliable - written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students
  • The right length and amount of information - includes the facts, issue, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents
  • Access in your class - works on your mobile and tablet
  • 45,900 briefs - keyed to 984 casebooks
  • Uniform format for every case brief
  • Written in plain English - not in legalese and not just repeating the court's language
  • Massive library of related video lessons - and practice questions
  • Top-notch customer support

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership