Joseph Little v. City of North Miami

805 F.2d 962 (1986)

From our private database of 45,900+ case briefs, written and edited by humans—never with AI.

Joseph Little v. City of North Miami

United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit
805 F.2d 962 (1986)

Facts

Joseph Little (plaintiff) was a law professor at the University of Florida. Little, a Florida bar member, represented a group called the Florida Defenders of the Environment in two state civil cases on a pro bono basis and with approval from the university. The City of North Miami (defendant) was an intervening party in one of the lawsuits, a state court civil action that involved the correctness of state appropriation of land owned by the city. North Miami’s city council adopted a resolution that publicly censured Little, alleging that, as a law professor, he was using state funds to represent a private party in an action against the city. The resolution was read aloud at a city council meeting and eventually circulated to the university and state legislature. Little did not receive notice of the resolution or an opportunity to challenge it. The resolution led to an investigation, but Little remained employed as a law professor. Little filed a suit against North Miami, council members, and the mayor (defendants) under 42 U.S.C. § 1983, which allowed individuals to sue government officials for violations of constitutional rights. The complaint alleged that Little suffered violations of his First Amendment right of free speech and Fourteenth Amendment right of due process. A district court dismissed the claims without prejudice. In evaluating Little’s First Amendment claim, the district court found that the city ordinance did not have the force of state law required for 42 U.S.C. § 1983 claims. With respect to Little’s due-process claim, the district court found that Little had only suffered harm to his reputation, because he remained employed with the university. Little appealed, arguing that his business reputation constituted a protected property interest.

Rule of Law

Issue

Holding and Reasoning (Per curiam)

What to do next…

  1. Unlock this case brief with a free (no-commitment) trial membership of Quimbee.

    You’ll be in good company: Quimbee is one of the most widely used and trusted sites for law students, serving more than 734,000 law students since 2011. Some law schools—such as Yale, Berkeley, and Northwestern—even subscribe directly to Quimbee for all their law students.

    Unlock this case briefRead our student testimonials
  2. Learn more about Quimbee’s unique (and proven) approach to achieving great grades at law school.

    Quimbee is a company hell-bent on one thing: helping you get an “A” in every course you take in law school, so you can graduate at the top of your class and get a high-paying law job. We’re not just a study aid for law students; we’re the study aid for law students.

    Learn about our approachRead more about Quimbee

Here's why 734,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:

  • Written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students. 45,900 briefs, keyed to 984 casebooks. Top-notch customer support.
  • The right amount of information, includes the facts, issues, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents.
  • Access in your classes, works on your mobile and tablet. Massive library of related video lessons and high quality multiple-choice questions.
  • Easy to use, uniform format for every case brief. Written in plain English, not in legalese. Our briefs summarize and simplify; they don’t just repeat the court’s language.

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership
Here's why 734,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:
  • Reliable - written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students
  • The right length and amount of information - includes the facts, issue, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents
  • Access in your class - works on your mobile and tablet
  • 45,900 briefs - keyed to 984 casebooks
  • Uniform format for every case brief
  • Written in plain English - not in legalese and not just repeating the court's language
  • Massive library of related video lessons - and practice questions
  • Top-notch customer support

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership