Koster v. United States

231 Ct. Cl. 301 (1982)

From our private database of 46,000+ case briefs, written and edited by humans—never with AI.

Koster v. United States

United States Court of Claims
231 Ct. Cl. 301 (1982)

DC

Facts

General Koster (plaintiff) was a commander in the United States Army during the Vietnam War. Koster had a long and distinguished military career and also served in various capacities during World War II and the Korean War. On March 16, 1968, a company of United States troops terrorized and murdered a large group of unarmed Vietnamese civilians in the My Lai hamlet of Vietnam. Although not directly involved in the incident, Koster subsequently became aware of several irregularities regarding the number of deaths and circumstances surrounding the incident that should have prompted him to inquire about the irregularities. In March 1970, court-marital charges were brought against Koster for failure to obey orders and dereliction of duty. The charges were later dismissed, but Koster received a number of administrative sanctions for failing to properly investigate the My Lai incident. Specifically, Koster’s status as temporary major general was vacated, he received a letter of censure, and his Distinguished Service Medal was withdrawn. As a result of these sanctions, Koster alleged that he lost the opportunity for permanent grade change and the retirement benefits that come with the higher grade. Koster appealed the administrative sanctions as well as a claim for improper retirement grade to the secretary of the army. The secretary upheld the sanctions as well as the retirement grade determination. Koster then appealed to the Army Board for Correction of Military Records (the ABCMR). While that appeal was pending, Koster sought review in the court of claims. The ABCMR subsequently upheld the sanctions as well as the denial of the retirement grade classification.

Rule of Law

Issue

Holding and Reasoning (Bennett, J.)

What to do next…

  1. Unlock this case brief with a free (no-commitment) trial membership of Quimbee.

    You’ll be in good company: Quimbee is one of the most widely used and trusted sites for law students, serving more than 742,000 law students since 2011. Some law schools—such as Yale, Berkeley, and Northwestern—even subscribe directly to Quimbee for all their law students.

    Unlock this case briefRead our student testimonials
  2. Learn more about Quimbee’s unique (and proven) approach to achieving great grades at law school.

    Quimbee is a company hell-bent on one thing: helping you get an “A” in every course you take in law school, so you can graduate at the top of your class and get a high-paying law job. We’re not just a study aid for law students; we’re the study aid for law students.

    Learn about our approachRead more about Quimbee

Here's why 742,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:

  • Written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students. 46,000 briefs, keyed to 986 casebooks. Top-notch customer support.
  • The right amount of information, includes the facts, issues, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents.
  • Access in your classes, works on your mobile and tablet. Massive library of related video lessons and high quality multiple-choice questions.
  • Easy to use, uniform format for every case brief. Written in plain English, not in legalese. Our briefs summarize and simplify; they don’t just repeat the court’s language.

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership
Here's why 742,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:
  • Reliable - written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students
  • The right length and amount of information - includes the facts, issue, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents
  • Access in your class - works on your mobile and tablet
  • 46,000 briefs - keyed to 986 casebooks
  • Uniform format for every case brief
  • Written in plain English - not in legalese and not just repeating the court's language
  • Massive library of related video lessons - and practice questions
  • Top-notch customer support

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership