Quimbee logo
DMCA.com Protection Status

M.C. Through Chudley v. Shawnee Mission Unified School District No. 512

363 F. Supp. 3d 1182 (2019)

Case BriefRelatedOptions
From our private database of 33,800+ case briefs...

M.C. Through Chudley v. Shawnee Mission Unified School District No. 512

United States District Court for the District of Kansas

363 F. Supp. 3d 1182 (2019)

Facts

Administrators of the Shawnee Mission Unified School District (school district) (defendant) learned that some students planned to participate in an organized national walkout to protest gun violence in schools. The school district informed parents that students would be permitted to participate in the protest without risking discipline but that the walkouts were optional and not sponsored by the school district. The school district issued a directive ordering building administrators to prohibit students from discussing guns, gun control, or school shootings during the protest. Instead, the school district encouraged students to address the topic of school safety. In response to this directive, on the day of the walkout, the assistant principal at Hocker Grove Middle School interfered with students’ speeches that addressed school shootings. The assistant principal warned students that they would be removed if they talked about shootings or deaths. An eighth-grade student (plaintiff) who helped organize the walkout at the middle school was interrupted when she began to speak about gun violence. An administrator ordered the student to step down from the speaking platform and the student complied. The assistant principal ended the event before the scheduled halfway point, directed the remaining 50 students to disperse, and pushed several students toward the school door. The assistant principal told the student speakers they were suspended or had detention. The students and their mothers (plaintiffs) brought suit in the district court and argued that the school district violated their free-speech rights under the First Amendment to the United States Constitution. The school district moved to dismiss the complaint.

Rule of Law

Issue

Holding and Reasoning (Robinson, C.J.)

What to do next…

  1. Unlock this case brief with a free (no-commitment) trial membership of Quimbee.

    You’ll be in good company: Quimbee is one of the most widely used and trusted sites for law students, serving more than 607,000 law students since 2011. Some law schools—such as Yale, Berkeley, and Northwestern—even subscribe directly to Quimbee for all their law students.

    Unlock this case briefRead our student testimonials
  2. Learn more about Quimbee’s unique (and proven) approach to achieving great grades at law school.

    Quimbee is a company hell-bent on one thing: helping you get an “A” in every course you take in law school, so you can graduate at the top of your class and get a high-paying law job. We’re not just a study aid for law students; we’re the study aid for law students.

    Learn about our approachRead more about Quimbee

Here's why 607,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:

  • Written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students. 33,800 briefs, keyed to 984 casebooks. Top-notch customer support.
  • The right amount of information, includes the facts, issues, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents.
  • Access in your classes, works on your mobile and tablet. Massive library of related video lessons and high quality multiple-choice questions.
  • Easy to use, uniform format for every case brief. Written in plain English, not in legalese. Our briefs summarize and simplify; they don’t just repeat the court’s language.

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership
Here's why 607,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:
  • Reliable - written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students
  • The right length and amount of information - includes the facts, issue, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents
  • Access in your class - works on your mobile and tablet
  • 33,800 briefs - keyed to 984 casebooks
  • Uniform format for every case brief
  • Written in plain English - not in legalese and not just repeating the court's language
  • Massive library of related video lessons - and practice questions
  • Top-notch customer support

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership