McDaniel v. 162 Columbia Heights Housing Corporations

863 N.Y.S.2d 346 (2008)

From our private database of 45,900+ case briefs, written and edited by humans—never with AI.

McDaniel v. 162 Columbia Heights Housing Corporations

New York Supreme Court
863 N.Y.S.2d 346 (2008)

Facts

162 Columbia Heights Housing Corporations (162 CHHC) (defendant) was a multiunit residential cooperative corporation that owned a building with a garden unit inside. Celeste Gudas purchased the garden unit from 162 CHHC. Gudas later sued 162 CHHC because 162 CHHC had refused to approve her renovation plans for the garden unit. 162 CHHC settled the lawsuit by agreeing to pay Gudas $550,000 in exchange for her relinquishment of all rights to the garden unit. K.C. McDaniel (plaintiff) advanced the $550,000 to 162 CHHC for the settlement payment. McDaniel allegedly had advanced an additional $251,000 to 162 CHHC to pay for its attorney’s fees and other fees regarding the garden unit. McDaniel contended that she had made these advances in exchange for a proprietary lease and the shares allocated to the garden unit. However, the parties never documented such an agreement in an authenticated agreement, and, per the settlement terms, 162 CHHC became the owner of the garden-unit shares. Thereafter, Keiko DeLille, a director and shareholder of 162 CHHC, purportedly demanded an additional $100,000 from McDaniel. McDaniel allegedly refused and demanded repayment of the prior advances to no avail. DeLille subsequently listed the garden unit for sale, which prompted McDaniel to file a financing statement naming 162 CHHC as the debtor and claiming to be a secured creditor with an interest in the garden unit and any proceeds of its lease or sale. 162 CHHC sold the garden unit to a third party for $850,000 and paid $650,000 to McDaniel. McDaniel eventually sued 162 CHHC and DeLille. During the proceedings, 162 CHHC and DeLille moved for an order directing McDaniel to terminate the financing statement and to pay statutory damages of $500 pursuant to Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) § 9-625. McDaniel argued that the financing statement was irrelevant because she held a common-law lien but that the financing statement nevertheless served to put third parties on notice of her interest.

Rule of Law

Issue

Holding and Reasoning (Demarest, J.)

What to do next…

  1. Unlock this case brief with a free (no-commitment) trial membership of Quimbee.

    You’ll be in good company: Quimbee is one of the most widely used and trusted sites for law students, serving more than 736,000 law students since 2011. Some law schools—such as Yale, Berkeley, and Northwestern—even subscribe directly to Quimbee for all their law students.

    Unlock this case briefRead our student testimonials
  2. Learn more about Quimbee’s unique (and proven) approach to achieving great grades at law school.

    Quimbee is a company hell-bent on one thing: helping you get an “A” in every course you take in law school, so you can graduate at the top of your class and get a high-paying law job. We’re not just a study aid for law students; we’re the study aid for law students.

    Learn about our approachRead more about Quimbee

Here's why 736,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:

  • Written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students. 45,900 briefs, keyed to 984 casebooks. Top-notch customer support.
  • The right amount of information, includes the facts, issues, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents.
  • Access in your classes, works on your mobile and tablet. Massive library of related video lessons and high quality multiple-choice questions.
  • Easy to use, uniform format for every case brief. Written in plain English, not in legalese. Our briefs summarize and simplify; they don’t just repeat the court’s language.

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership
Here's why 736,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:
  • Reliable - written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students
  • The right length and amount of information - includes the facts, issue, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents
  • Access in your class - works on your mobile and tablet
  • 45,900 briefs - keyed to 984 casebooks
  • Uniform format for every case brief
  • Written in plain English - not in legalese and not just repeating the court's language
  • Massive library of related video lessons - and practice questions
  • Top-notch customer support

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership