Moore v. Moore

779 S.E.2d 533 (2015)

From our private database of 46,000+ case briefs, written and edited by humans—never with AI.

Moore v. Moore

South Carolina Supreme Court
779 S.E.2d 533 (2015)

  • Written by Tammy Boggs, JD

Facts

Whitney Moore (plaintiff) and Arthur Moore (defendant) married in 2001. The Moores started a business called Candelabra, which was owned 51 percent by Whitney and 49 percent by Arthur. Whitney served as president of Candelabra and was responsible for overseeing all its business operations. Candelabra was a retail business that sold trendy lighting and home products in Charleston in a retail showroom. Whitney had a background in business, marketing, and sales, and she worked on developing strong relationships with contractors and industry suppliers. Arthur occasionally contributed through manual labor or providing ideas for business growth. Whitney, however, was usually the one to implement the ideas. When a recession hit, the Moores mutually agreed to pursue a strategy of converting the company to a website business. Arthur had many ideas regarding expanding the website, but Whitney primarily executed plans to revolutionize the website. The strategy proved successful so that nearly 80 percent of Candelabra’s sales as of June 2011 were from its website. In June 2011, Whitney filed for divorce. At that time, Candelabra’s tangible assets were worth $353,687. The business’s actual market value was much higher. Whitney and Arthur presented conflicting expert testimony regarding the company’s valuation and the percentage attributable to (1) enterprise goodwill and (2) Whitney’s personal goodwill. The family court relied exclusively on Arthur’s expert’s valuation and found that 90 percent of the goodwill of the company was enterprise goodwill that would be included in the marital estate and equitably distributed. The parties appealed. Whitney argued that the court erred in including any goodwill in the marital estate.

Rule of Law

Issue

Holding and Reasoning (Kittredge, J.)

What to do next…

  1. Unlock this case brief with a free (no-commitment) trial membership of Quimbee.

    You’ll be in good company: Quimbee is one of the most widely used and trusted sites for law students, serving more than 742,000 law students since 2011. Some law schools—such as Yale, Berkeley, and Northwestern—even subscribe directly to Quimbee for all their law students.

    Unlock this case briefRead our student testimonials
  2. Learn more about Quimbee’s unique (and proven) approach to achieving great grades at law school.

    Quimbee is a company hell-bent on one thing: helping you get an “A” in every course you take in law school, so you can graduate at the top of your class and get a high-paying law job. We’re not just a study aid for law students; we’re the study aid for law students.

    Learn about our approachRead more about Quimbee

Here's why 742,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:

  • Written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students. 46,000 briefs, keyed to 986 casebooks. Top-notch customer support.
  • The right amount of information, includes the facts, issues, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents.
  • Access in your classes, works on your mobile and tablet. Massive library of related video lessons and high quality multiple-choice questions.
  • Easy to use, uniform format for every case brief. Written in plain English, not in legalese. Our briefs summarize and simplify; they don’t just repeat the court’s language.

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership
Here's why 742,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:
  • Reliable - written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students
  • The right length and amount of information - includes the facts, issue, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents
  • Access in your class - works on your mobile and tablet
  • 46,000 briefs - keyed to 986 casebooks
  • Uniform format for every case brief
  • Written in plain English - not in legalese and not just repeating the court's language
  • Massive library of related video lessons - and practice questions
  • Top-notch customer support

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership