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Roelandt ex rel. Roelandt v. Apfel

125 F. Supp. 2d 1138 (2001)

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Roelandt ex rel. Roelandt v. Apfel

United States District Court for the Southern District of Iowa

125 F. Supp. 2d 1138 (2001)

Facts

William J. Roelandt’s father (plaintiff) filed for supplemental security income on Roelandt’s behalf, alleging that he was disabled due to severe attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Roelandt’s father provided school records documenting his increasingly disruptive and violent behavior and medical evidence showing that Roelandt was first prescribed medication to control his ADHD in 1994, the dosage was increased at least four times over four years, the brand was briefly substituted with no effectiveness, and Roelandt had a hard time keeping up with the schedule for taking it. Medical records further showed that Roelandt exhibited signs of depression, anxiety, and paranoia and that he had been hospitalized with suicidal and homicidal ideations. Roelandt’s school records showed that he had 24 disciplinary reports of incidents, in one school year, including disrupting class, threatening students and staff, fighting, sexual assault, and suspension. Roelandt’s application was denied initially, upon reconsideration, and following a hearing before an administrative-law judge (ALJ). The ALJ found that Roelandt suffered from severe impairments but that the impairments were not of the severity to meet nor medically or functionally equal the administration’s listing of ADHD. The ALJ’s decision became the final decision of the Commissioner of the Social Security Administration, Kenneth Apfel (defendant). Roelandt filed a complaint in United States district court.

Rule of Law

Issue

Holding and Reasoning (Pratt, J.)

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