Quimbee logo
DMCA.com Protection Status

Sines v. Kessler

324 F. Supp. 3d 765 (2018)

Case BriefRelatedOptions
From our private database of 30,900+ case briefs...

Sines v. Kessler

United States District Court for the Western District of Virginia

324 F. Supp. 3d 765 (2018)

Facts

In 2017, members of White-supremacist, neo-Nazi, and right-wing militia groups organized a “Unite the Right” rally protesting a Confederate statue’s removal from a Charlottesville, Virginia park. Leaders met in person, then Jason Kessler (codefendant) used an online platform called Discord to organize. Discord conversation included racist jokes and slurs, directions to wear “good fighting uniforms” and bring “picket sign post, shields, and other self-defense implements which can be turned from a free speech tool to a self-defense weapon.” Leaders encouraged throwing torches at counter-protestors and ordered marchers to “charge!” Violence erupted, causing multiple injuries. White supremacist James Fields Jr. plowed his car at high speed into a crowd of counter-protesters, killing one and severely injuring many others. Those injured brought a civil action against Kessler and other organizers, the Ku Klux Klan, various neo-Nazi organizations and associated white supremacists (codefendants), alleging they conspired to engage in violence against racial minorities and their supporters. The claimants also named Michael Peinovich (codefendant), who hosted a racist podcast, appeared on a poster promoting the event, and spoke to followers afterward, but did not allege he participated in the violence or joined in the conspiracy that planned it. Those accused moved to dismiss on First Amendment and other grounds, including that White claimants lacked standing because the rally involved animus against non-whites only.

Rule of Law

Issue

Holding and Reasoning (Moon, J.)

What to do next…

  1. Unlock this case brief with a free (no-commitment) trial membership of Quimbee.

    You’ll be in good company: Quimbee is one of the most widely used and trusted sites for law students, serving more than 551,000 law students since 2011. Some law schools—such as Yale, Berkeley, and Northwestern—even subscribe directly to Quimbee for all their law students.

    Unlock this case briefRead our student testimonials
  2. Learn more about Quimbee’s unique (and proven) approach to achieving great grades at law school.

    Quimbee is a company hell-bent on one thing: helping you get an “A” in every course you take in law school, so you can graduate at the top of your class and get a high-paying law job. We’re not just a study aid for law students; we’re the study aid for law students.

    Learn about our approachRead more about Quimbee

Here's why 551,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:

  • Written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students. 30,900 briefs, keyed to 984 casebooks. Top-notch customer support.
  • The right amount of information, includes the facts, issues, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents.
  • Access in your classes, works on your mobile and tablet. Massive library of related video lessons and high quality multiple-choice questions.
  • Easy to use, uniform format for every case brief. Written in plain English, not in legalese. Our briefs summarize and simplify; they don’t just repeat the court’s language.

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership
Here's why 551,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:
  • Reliable - written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students
  • The right length and amount of information - includes the facts, issue, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents
  • Access in your class - works on your mobile and tablet
  • 30,900 briefs - keyed to 984 casebooks
  • Uniform format for every case brief
  • Written in plain English - not in legalese and not just repeating the court's language
  • Massive library of related video lessons - and practice questions
  • Top-notch customer support

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership