Quimbee logo
DMCA.com Protection Status

Sloane v. Equifax Information Services, LLC

510 F.3d 495 (2007)

Case BriefRelatedOptions
From our private database of 33,600+ case briefs...

Sloane v. Equifax Information Services, LLC

United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit

510 F.3d 495 (2007)

Facts

Someone stole the identity of Suzanne Sloane (plaintiff). After Sloane discovered the theft, she asked Equifax Information Services, LLC (Equifax) (defendant) to correct her credit report. During the ensuing months, Sloane applied for a home loan but was denied due to her uncorrected credit score. Sloane also applied for a car loan, but she was offered the loan on worse terms than she would have received absent the uncorrected report. Sloane repeatedly asked Equifax to correct the report but was ultimately unsuccessful. At one point, Equifax actually sent a letter to Sloane that was addressed to the identity thief, warning the thief that someone may have stolen the thief’s identity. Approximately 21 months after the identity theft, Equifax still had not fixed the report. Consequently, Sloane sued Equifax for violating the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA). Sloane sought economic and emotional-distress damages. At trial, Sloane described in detail her emotional distress caused by the ongoing encounters with Equifax and the failure to fix the report. Sloane stated that the emotional distress manifested itself in insomnia. Sloane also provided examples of her marriage suffering as a result. Sloane’s husband testified that Sloane’s emotional distress was observable to him and others. The jury returned a verdict in Sloane’s favor, and the district court entered a judgment of $106,000 for economic damages and $245,000 for emotional-distress damages. Equifax appealed, arguing that the jury award was excessive. Other FCRA cases involving identity theft resulted in awards of under $100,000. Prior to the FCRA’s enactment, defamation was how plaintiffs received compensation for distribution of misinformation. Defamation cases often resulted in jury awards of $250,000.

Rule of Law

Issue

Holding and Reasoning (Motz, J.)

What to do next…

  1. Unlock this case brief with a free (no-commitment) trial membership of Quimbee.

    You’ll be in good company: Quimbee is one of the most widely used and trusted sites for law students, serving more than 602,000 law students since 2011. Some law schools—such as Yale, Berkeley, and Northwestern—even subscribe directly to Quimbee for all their law students.

    Unlock this case briefRead our student testimonials
  2. Learn more about Quimbee’s unique (and proven) approach to achieving great grades at law school.

    Quimbee is a company hell-bent on one thing: helping you get an “A” in every course you take in law school, so you can graduate at the top of your class and get a high-paying law job. We’re not just a study aid for law students; we’re the study aid for law students.

    Learn about our approachRead more about Quimbee

Here's why 602,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:

  • Written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students. 33,600 briefs, keyed to 984 casebooks. Top-notch customer support.
  • The right amount of information, includes the facts, issues, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents.
  • Access in your classes, works on your mobile and tablet. Massive library of related video lessons and high quality multiple-choice questions.
  • Easy to use, uniform format for every case brief. Written in plain English, not in legalese. Our briefs summarize and simplify; they don’t just repeat the court’s language.

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership
Here's why 602,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:
  • Reliable - written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students
  • The right length and amount of information - includes the facts, issue, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents
  • Access in your class - works on your mobile and tablet
  • 33,600 briefs - keyed to 984 casebooks
  • Uniform format for every case brief
  • Written in plain English - not in legalese and not just repeating the court's language
  • Massive library of related video lessons - and practice questions
  • Top-notch customer support

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership