Society for Ethical Culture in the City of New York v. Spatt

68 A.D.2d 112 (1979)

From our private database of 45,900+ case briefs, written and edited by humans—never with AI.

Society for Ethical Culture in the City of New York v. Spatt

New York Supreme Court
68 A.D.2d 112 (1979)

  • Written by Jody Stuart, JD

Facts

The Society for Ethical Culture in the City of New York (society) (plaintiff) was a religious, educational, and charitable organization that owned an entire block front on Central Park West, which included two five-story buildings. One building was the society’s religious meeting house, which was built in 1910 to serve as the society’s headquarters and had continued to serve that function. The meeting house contained an auditorium and administrative offices and was constructed in the art nouveau architectural style. The second building housed the society’s school. In the late 1960s, the society had begun to explore the potential to develop its property, which had become desirable due to its proximity to Lincoln Center. The most attractive proposal was a plan for demolishing the two buildings, constructing high-rise buildings, and leasing the property to a developer. The society would then occupy the lower floors of a high-rise. It was estimated that the society could expect to receive $2 million to be applied to new school facilities on another site or toward the society’s other charitable purposes. The society had to abandon the plan in 1971 due to the depressed real estate market. The Landmark Preservation Commission (commission) (defendant) designated the meeting house as a landmark in 1974. The society then commenced an Article 78 proceeding to annul the landmark designation, alleging that the designation was unconstitutional. The trial court annulled the designation. The commission appealed.

Rule of Law

Issue

Holding and Reasoning (Sullivan, J.)

What to do next…

  1. Unlock this case brief with a free (no-commitment) trial membership of Quimbee.

    You’ll be in good company: Quimbee is one of the most widely used and trusted sites for law students, serving more than 742,000 law students since 2011. Some law schools—such as Yale, Berkeley, and Northwestern—even subscribe directly to Quimbee for all their law students.

    Unlock this case briefRead our student testimonials
  2. Learn more about Quimbee’s unique (and proven) approach to achieving great grades at law school.

    Quimbee is a company hell-bent on one thing: helping you get an “A” in every course you take in law school, so you can graduate at the top of your class and get a high-paying law job. We’re not just a study aid for law students; we’re the study aid for law students.

    Learn about our approachRead more about Quimbee

Here's why 742,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:

  • Written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students. 45,900 briefs, keyed to 984 casebooks. Top-notch customer support.
  • The right amount of information, includes the facts, issues, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents.
  • Access in your classes, works on your mobile and tablet. Massive library of related video lessons and high quality multiple-choice questions.
  • Easy to use, uniform format for every case brief. Written in plain English, not in legalese. Our briefs summarize and simplify; they don’t just repeat the court’s language.

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership
Here's why 742,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:
  • Reliable - written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students
  • The right length and amount of information - includes the facts, issue, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents
  • Access in your class - works on your mobile and tablet
  • 45,900 briefs - keyed to 984 casebooks
  • Uniform format for every case brief
  • Written in plain English - not in legalese and not just repeating the court's language
  • Massive library of related video lessons - and practice questions
  • Top-notch customer support

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership