Stanley v. McGrath

719 F.2d 279 (1983)

From our private database of 45,900+ case briefs, written and edited by humans—never with AI.

Stanley v. McGrath

United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit
719 F.2d 279 (1983)

Facts

Following the publication of a controversial issue of a student-run newspaper, the Minnesota Daily (the Daily), the University of Minnesota (Minnesota) (defendant) took measures to change the funding system for the newspaper. The controversial edition featured numerous cartoons, articles, and advertisements satirizing religion, ethnic groups, social groups, and various customs. Prior to the change, the Daily received funding from a compulsory fee that Minnesota collected from all students. Following the controversial issue, and amid public outcry from the student body and pressure from the Minnesota state legislature, Minnesota’s board of regents (the board) voted to change the funding system to allow students to obtain a refund of the fee. Minnesota claimed that it was motivated by concerns expressed by its students. Several members of the board testified that they did not think students should be forced to support a vulgar and sacrilegious newspaper. Minnesota only implemented a change at its main campus, where the Daily operated. Catherine Stanley and other former editors of the Daily (the Daily staff) (plaintiffs) brought an action against Minnesota, alleging that its decision to change the funding system was based in part on opposition to the content of the controversial edition, in violation of the First Amendment. A district court concluded that no violation had occurred based on two key findings: (1) the overall funding for the Daily had increased because the compulsory student fee had been raised over three years; and (2) Minnesota was motivated by the desire to respond to students’ concerns about funding the paper. The Daily staff appealed.

Rule of Law

Issue

Holding and Reasoning (Arnold, J.)

What to do next…

  1. Unlock this case brief with a free (no-commitment) trial membership of Quimbee.

    You’ll be in good company: Quimbee is one of the most widely used and trusted sites for law students, serving more than 734,000 law students since 2011. Some law schools—such as Yale, Berkeley, and Northwestern—even subscribe directly to Quimbee for all their law students.

    Unlock this case briefRead our student testimonials
  2. Learn more about Quimbee’s unique (and proven) approach to achieving great grades at law school.

    Quimbee is a company hell-bent on one thing: helping you get an “A” in every course you take in law school, so you can graduate at the top of your class and get a high-paying law job. We’re not just a study aid for law students; we’re the study aid for law students.

    Learn about our approachRead more about Quimbee

Here's why 734,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:

  • Written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students. 45,900 briefs, keyed to 984 casebooks. Top-notch customer support.
  • The right amount of information, includes the facts, issues, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents.
  • Access in your classes, works on your mobile and tablet. Massive library of related video lessons and high quality multiple-choice questions.
  • Easy to use, uniform format for every case brief. Written in plain English, not in legalese. Our briefs summarize and simplify; they don’t just repeat the court’s language.

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership
Here's why 734,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:
  • Reliable - written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students
  • The right length and amount of information - includes the facts, issue, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents
  • Access in your class - works on your mobile and tablet
  • 45,900 briefs - keyed to 984 casebooks
  • Uniform format for every case brief
  • Written in plain English - not in legalese and not just repeating the court's language
  • Massive library of related video lessons - and practice questions
  • Top-notch customer support

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership