Quimbee logo
DMCA.com Protection Status

State v. Papillon

173 N.H. 13, 236 A.3d 839 (2020)

Case BriefRelatedOptions
From our private database of 34,000+ case briefs...

State v. Papillon

New Hampshire Supreme Court

173 N.H. 13, 236 A.3d 839 (2020)

Facts

Paulson Papillon (defendant), Adrien Stillwell, Nathaniel Smith, and Michael Younge sold drugs. On October 21, 2015, a confidential informant and M.P., a regular buyer, each purchased drugs from Papillon. Arrested that day, Papillon erroneously believed M.P. was the informant. Papillon, released on bail, began urging Stillwell, Smith, and Younge to kill M.P. in advance of Papillon’s court hearing. On Halloween, Papillon, providing a gun and costumes, urged his conspirators to kill M.P. that night. Papillon went to a Connecticut casino to establish an alibi. Stillwell, Smith, and Younge decided against killing M.P. that night. Cellphone records showed increased contact between the conspirators. On November 3, Stillwell, Smith, and Younge found M.P. outside his apartment building. Stillwell fatally shot M.P. Within minutes, Stillwell called and texted Papillon, who was intentionally in Massachusetts. Papillon told A.D. to try calling M.P., seeking to confirm his death. Papillon returned, heard from his conspirators about M.P’s death, and distributed drugs and money to them. The next day, Papillon took Stillwell and Younge to Connecticut. After a few days, Papillon returned to New Hampshire and told an associate, “There’s where I killed my f**king rat.” Papillon, Stillwell, and Smith were all soon arrested on unrelated charges, and Younge turned himself in. While in jail, Papillon coordinated with his sister to deliver drugs to Younge and money to Stillwell to keep them quiet and planned to bail out and kill his coconspirators before they could talk to the police. Papillon told L.M. in jail that he had to have M.P. killed. A jury convicted Papillon of conspiracy. Papillon appealed, arguing the evidence was insufficient to support his conviction.

Rule of Law

Issue

Holding and Reasoning (Hantz Marconi, J.)

What to do next…

  1. Unlock this case brief with a free (no-commitment) trial membership of Quimbee.

    You’ll be in good company: Quimbee is one of the most widely used and trusted sites for law students, serving more than 607,000 law students since 2011. Some law schools—such as Yale, Berkeley, and Northwestern—even subscribe directly to Quimbee for all their law students.

    Unlock this case briefRead our student testimonials
  2. Learn more about Quimbee’s unique (and proven) approach to achieving great grades at law school.

    Quimbee is a company hell-bent on one thing: helping you get an “A” in every course you take in law school, so you can graduate at the top of your class and get a high-paying law job. We’re not just a study aid for law students; we’re the study aid for law students.

    Learn about our approachRead more about Quimbee

Here's why 607,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:

  • Written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students. 34,000 briefs, keyed to 984 casebooks. Top-notch customer support.
  • The right amount of information, includes the facts, issues, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents.
  • Access in your classes, works on your mobile and tablet. Massive library of related video lessons and high quality multiple-choice questions.
  • Easy to use, uniform format for every case brief. Written in plain English, not in legalese. Our briefs summarize and simplify; they don’t just repeat the court’s language.

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership
Here's why 607,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:
  • Reliable - written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students
  • The right length and amount of information - includes the facts, issue, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents
  • Access in your class - works on your mobile and tablet
  • 34,000 briefs - keyed to 984 casebooks
  • Uniform format for every case brief
  • Written in plain English - not in legalese and not just repeating the court's language
  • Massive library of related video lessons - and practice questions
  • Top-notch customer support

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership