United States v. Farrell

563 F.3d 364 (2009)

From our private database of 46,000+ case briefs, written and edited by humans—never with AI.

United States v. Farrell

United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit
563 F.3d 364 (2009)

RW

Facts

The federal government (plaintiff) prosecuted Robert John Farrell and Angelita Magat Farrell (defendants) for several offenses, including the imposition of peonage, conspiracy to impose peonage, and the imposition of document servitude, in violation of 18 U.S.C. §§ 1581, 371, and 1592. The trial evidence established that the Farrells recruited nine Filipino women to come to the United States and work as housekeepers in the Farrells' hotel. The Farrells deceived immigration officials into issuing temporary visas, and then forced the women to pay the visa-processing fee and their travel expenses. Once the women arrived in this country, the Farrells confiscated their passports and visas. The Farrells paid the women far less than they had been promised, and then charged the women excessive fees for their transportation, housing, and personal items. This caused the women to run up large debts, which the Farrells made them repay by forcing them to take second jobs and work 17 hours every day. The Farrells forbade the women from socializing, verbally abused them, deprived them of their privacy, required them to request permission to perform the most mundane tasks, and threatened them with deportation if they failed to comply with the Farrells' demands. Despite being terrified of the Farrells, the women eventually alerted authorities, who investigated their plight and arrested the Farrells. The jury found the Farrells guilty. On appeal to the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals, the Farrells contended that the evidence was insufficient to sustain their convictions.

Rule of Law

Issue

Holding and Reasoning (Melloy, J.)

What to do next…

  1. Unlock this case brief with a free (no-commitment) trial membership of Quimbee.

    You’ll be in good company: Quimbee is one of the most widely used and trusted sites for law students, serving more than 742,000 law students since 2011. Some law schools—such as Yale, Berkeley, and Northwestern—even subscribe directly to Quimbee for all their law students.

    Unlock this case briefRead our student testimonials
  2. Learn more about Quimbee’s unique (and proven) approach to achieving great grades at law school.

    Quimbee is a company hell-bent on one thing: helping you get an “A” in every course you take in law school, so you can graduate at the top of your class and get a high-paying law job. We’re not just a study aid for law students; we’re the study aid for law students.

    Learn about our approachRead more about Quimbee

Here's why 742,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:

  • Written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students. 46,000 briefs, keyed to 986 casebooks. Top-notch customer support.
  • The right amount of information, includes the facts, issues, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents.
  • Access in your classes, works on your mobile and tablet. Massive library of related video lessons and high quality multiple-choice questions.
  • Easy to use, uniform format for every case brief. Written in plain English, not in legalese. Our briefs summarize and simplify; they don’t just repeat the court’s language.

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership
Here's why 742,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:
  • Reliable - written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students
  • The right length and amount of information - includes the facts, issue, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents
  • Access in your class - works on your mobile and tablet
  • 46,000 briefs - keyed to 986 casebooks
  • Uniform format for every case brief
  • Written in plain English - not in legalese and not just repeating the court's language
  • Massive library of related video lessons - and practice questions
  • Top-notch customer support

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership