Gheta v. Nassau County Community College

33 F. Supp. 2d 179 (1999)

From our private database of 45,900+ case briefs, written and edited by humans—never with AI.

Gheta v. Nassau County Community College

United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York
33 F. Supp. 2d 179 (1999)

Facts

Nassau County Community College (NCCC) (defendants), a public community college in New York, offered an elective course (PED 251) on human sexuality that students could take to fulfill a two-credit health requirement. As part of the course, students were required to read two textbooks addressing various topics related to sexuality, including anatomy and functioning of reproductive systems, childbirth, abortion, birth control, sexually transmitted diseases, premarital sex, and homosexuality. The materials and textbooks also discussed religious, social, and historical perspectives on sexuality. One of the textbooks explored differences between how sex was viewed in Western religions and Eastern religions, claiming that Western religions have taken a stricter, more repressive view of sex. The other textbook discussed how Christianity came to view both sex outside of marriage and homosexuality as sinful. The authors of both books expressed the view that rigid gender roles are limiting. Although not explicitly telling students to reject their religious beliefs, the textbooks encouraged students to examine how their religious beliefs affected their views on sexuality. Students were encouraged to try something new by attending a gay-rights rally, interviewing a member of the clergy, or getting a gynecological exam. Barbara Gheta (plaintiff), along with other students who had taken the course, filed suit against NCCC, arguing that the course, taken as a whole, belittled Christian ideology and violated the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment. NCCC filed a motion for summary judgment.

Rule of Law

Issue

Holding and Reasoning (Gershon, J.)

What to do next…

  1. Unlock this case brief with a free (no-commitment) trial membership of Quimbee.

    You’ll be in good company: Quimbee is one of the most widely used and trusted sites for law students, serving more than 734,000 law students since 2011. Some law schools—such as Yale, Berkeley, and Northwestern—even subscribe directly to Quimbee for all their law students.

    Unlock this case briefRead our student testimonials
  2. Learn more about Quimbee’s unique (and proven) approach to achieving great grades at law school.

    Quimbee is a company hell-bent on one thing: helping you get an “A” in every course you take in law school, so you can graduate at the top of your class and get a high-paying law job. We’re not just a study aid for law students; we’re the study aid for law students.

    Learn about our approachRead more about Quimbee

Here's why 734,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:

  • Written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students. 45,900 briefs, keyed to 984 casebooks. Top-notch customer support.
  • The right amount of information, includes the facts, issues, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents.
  • Access in your classes, works on your mobile and tablet. Massive library of related video lessons and high quality multiple-choice questions.
  • Easy to use, uniform format for every case brief. Written in plain English, not in legalese. Our briefs summarize and simplify; they don’t just repeat the court’s language.

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership
Here's why 734,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:
  • Reliable - written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students
  • The right length and amount of information - includes the facts, issue, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents
  • Access in your class - works on your mobile and tablet
  • 45,900 briefs - keyed to 984 casebooks
  • Uniform format for every case brief
  • Written in plain English - not in legalese and not just repeating the court's language
  • Massive library of related video lessons - and practice questions
  • Top-notch customer support

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership