Quimbee logo
DMCA.com Protection Status

Veasey v. Abbott

830 F.3d 216 (2016)

Case BriefQ&ARelatedOptions
From our private database of 22,300+ case briefs...

Veasey v. Abbott

United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit

830 F.3d 216 (2016)

Facts

Texas (defendant) passed Senate Bill 14 (SB 14) requiring voters to show photo identification before voting. The Texas legislature described SB 14 as protecting ballot integrity. Opponents of the bill noted that in-person voter fraud, the only type protected against by SB 14, had resulted in only two convictions in the decade before SB 14 was passed and that mail-in voting, not covered by SB 14, had a much greater potential for fraud. During deliberations, opponents of the bill testified that minority voters would likely be disparately impacted by SB 14, and the opponents proposed ameliorative amendments, which were rejected. After SB 14 passed, Black and Hispanic voters were respectively 305 percent and 195 percent more likely to lack the required documents than were White voters. Texas also had a history of discriminating against minority voters. For example, Texas regularly violated the Voting Rights Act (VRA) by racially gerrymandering districts. Historical discrimination against minorities in education, health, and employment also placed burdens on minority groups’ abilities to fully engage with the political process. A group of minority voters (the minority voters) (plaintiffs) challenged SB 14 under § 2 of the Voting Rights Act. The district court found that SB 14 violated the VRA because it was adopted with a discriminatory purpose and had a discriminatory effect on minority voters. Texas appealed, and the Fifth Circuit found errors in the district court’s discriminatory-purpose analysis but affirmed the district court’s holding that SB 14 had a discriminatory effect in violation of § 2 of the VRA. Texas petitioned the court to rehear the case en banc.

Rule of Law

Issue

Holding and Reasoning (Haynes, J.)

Concurrence/Dissent (Jones, J.)

What to do next…

  1. Unlock this case brief with a free (no-commitment) trial membership of Quimbee.

    You’ll be in good company: Quimbee is one of the most widely used and trusted sites for law students, serving more than 518,000 law students since 2011. Some law schools—such as Yale, Berkeley, and Northwestern—even subscribe directly to Quimbee for all their law students.

    Unlock this case briefRead our student testimonials
  2. Learn more about Quimbee’s unique (and proven) approach to achieving great grades at law school.

    Quimbee is a company hell-bent on one thing: helping you get an “A” in every course you take in law school, so you can graduate at the top of your class and get a high-paying law job. We’re not just a study aid for law students; we’re the study aid for law students.

    Learn about our approachRead more about Quimbee

Here's why 518,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:

  • Written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students. 22,300 briefs, keyed to 984 casebooks. Top-notch customer support.
  • The right amount of information, includes the facts, issues, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents.
  • Access in your classes, works on your mobile and tablet. Massive library of related video lessons and high quality multiple-choice questions.
  • Easy to use, uniform format for every case brief. Written in plain English, not in legalese. Our briefs summarize and simplify; they don’t just repeat the court’s language.

Questions and answers

Have a question about this case?

Sign up for a free 7-day trial and ask it

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership
Here's why 518,000 law students have relied on our case briefs:
  • Reliable - written by law professors and practitioners, not other law students
  • The right length and amount of information - includes the facts, issue, rule of law, holding and reasoning, and any concurrences and dissents
  • Access in your class - works on your mobile and tablet
  • 22,300 briefs - keyed to 984 casebooks
  • Uniform format for every case brief
  • Written in plain English - not in legalese and not just repeating the court's language
  • Massive library of related video lessons - and practice questions
  • Top-notch customer support

Access this case brief for FREE

With a 7-day free trial membership